Alfred Newbould1,2,3

M, b. 10 May 1855, d. 17 December 1918
ChartsNicholas and Elizabeth Fleming Mahony Descendancy Chart
     Their intended destination was Waterbury, and they arrived at the Port of New York aboard the S.S. Aurania on 20 December 1886 with their two daughters, Lottie and Alice, and Lizzie's nephew, Tom Mahony. Allen Morrisey, grandson of Alfred and Elizabeth, mentioned that the family left Sheffield for Waterbury since they were in the cutlery business and Waterbury had just started the same manufacturing company. Job opportunities were plentiful.4,5
     Alfred Newbould and Elizabeth Mahony wrote the following letter to Mr. and Mrs. Guest East Main Street, Waterbury, Connecticut, 24 December 1886: Dear Mr. amd Mrs. Guest
We arrived safe on Monday last, December 20th after a most terrific voyage. I am sorry to say that both Lizzie and Tom have never been able to leave their bed since the first day we sailed. Been dreadfully sick all the way, which caused me to have to attend to them and wash the children each morning. In fact I never did such strange domestic work in my life before. I pulled through first class myself. I was not sick, therefore I was able to attend to their wants more than I should, had I been bad. On the Wednesday after sailing during the night, we fully expected we should never reach our destination, I am sure.
I never expected (to be) writing to you, but being on one of the best boats afloat, we weathered the storm; you can understand the roughness of the sea when I tell you that The City of Berlin (sailed four days before us) and the Brittania with our letter to "Jos" on board, which sailed the Thursday before us, and ours, the "Aurania" all three arrived at New York within an hour of each other. The Brittania had lost all her life boats but one, and one Sheffield passenger whilst washing was knocked with his head against the ships side and killed. Our children did very well especially "Alice". She could eat like a young ox, and as I squared the steward I got fowl and turkey, soles, and other delicacies which caused the children to eat hearty and relish their food much better. Well, but after all this trouble and excitement we at last reached New York and finally we reached our destination "Waterbury", where we of course found Jos, Lizzie, and family. When we arrived at New York we telegraphed to Jos as we soon knew we had cought our letter; but Jos met us at Waterbury station, but I must say "depot" as station is not correct here.
Well the surprise was great at receiving our telegram announcing our being at New York, but we found them in good health. John has got a good store or shop, as we say in England, and is doing a good trade. It takes him all morning to take orders out with his horse and dray and Tom has commenced helping him and is already serving in the store. John's average weekly taking are about 220 dollars per week, in English money between 40 and 50 pounds. So you will find he is not doing so bad. But all the shops here seems so very busy. For a little town I never see such grand and busy shops. They are equally as grand and large and more business than Sheffield shops. There is a man and wife who has been staying with Jos who came to America 6 weeks since who I knew. He kept a beerhouse under Watsons like me and they robbed him as they have me. But he is leaving Jos today to let us have the rooms. I want to stay in Waterbury as I like it if I can get work and I think I can as I have been introduced this morning to a foreman where I think I shall get on, which will be a good start as I shall get 2 dollars a day to start with ( 8 shilling four pence) in English. But I will save particulars in my next letter. There is a very large button factory here and also a pin factory. I must conclude, so if you see Lizzie's Mother and Father, do so and tell them we arrived safe at last, and are very comfprtable indeed with Jos. And write by return of post telling us all the news. Hoping you have had a Merry Christmas, and will have a Happy and prosperous New Year. Believe us to remain,
Your Sincere Friends,
Alf, and Lizzie Newbould

P.S. Jos and wife, John and all the rest of family send their kind regards
Note: On last page, in Alfred Guest's handwriting, "Received this letter Jan 7th 1887 Friday at half past one."6 Alfred Newbould was a laborer in March 1887 at Waterbury, Connecticut.7
     Alfred Newbould appears as Alfred Newbould, age 34, in the census of 1891 at Toxteth Park, Liverpool, Lancashire, England,in the household of Walter Davis S. Boadle as a visitor; Amelia's sister, Elizabeth, her husband, Alfred, and daughters, Lottie, Alice and Carrie were visiting the Boadle family at the time of the enumeration. A servant by the name of Elizabeth Booth, age 49, was also living in the household.8 Alfred Newbould was a clockmaker in 1891 at Waterbury, Connecticut.9 He and Elizabeth Mahony were visiting Elizabeth's sister, Amelia Boadle (husband Walter and daughter Amelia) with their children Carrie, Lottie, and Alice in 1891 at 45 Upper Hill Street, Toxteth Park, England.8
     Alfred Newbould and Elizabeth Mahony wrote the following letter to Mr. and Mrs. Guest Box 86 Post Office, Meriden, Connecticut, 15 December 1891: Dear Friends, If a thunderbolt had dropped at our door, we should not have had such a surprise as we did when I read your letter to Lizzie. She sat just like a statue for several moments, and said "I can't think it is so. In fact we could neither of us speak for a while I assure you. I have been working until 7:30 PM lately; we are so busy in my line of work, but tonight, Monday, I left at the usual time 5:30 p.m. for the sole reason to write again to Sheffield to you, to ask you if you had received our last letter, as Lizzie lately has worried a great deal about you not writing, and often said "I wonder whatever has caused Mr. and Mrs. Guest to be offended; I'm all the time wondering about them. But when at nearly 7 o'clock tonight I brought on your letter from "Newark" you can't wonder at our surprise.
Well, now that you are in the land of the Stars and Stripes, we both wish you very good luck, and hope you will prosper well under them. And as you say, have a cup of tea with us.Lizzie says ask them to come up here, tell them we have plenty of room, and probably if Mr. Guest can't come Mrs. and children can. We should both be very glad to see you if you could come, of course, we know you will be busy one way or another and don't know your future intentions and ideas, but we shall anxiously await another letter telling us some particulars of the "whys" and the "wherefores" as to why you so unexpectedly land amongst us, and without any warning, too. We are glad to say we are getting on very nicely, and have nothing to complain about, considering the short time we have been here, we are very comfortable, much more so than when you last saw us.
Just a word or two as to our opinion of this country, and you coming out here, we both think you have done right in coming, and think work is more regular than at home, which will just suit you, as we know you like a regular way of going on. Excuse more this time. We will wait until we hear again. The children can't sleep for talking of Abbey and James Henry, Lizzie keeps trying to sew bu puts it down, with the remark "I'm upset! I can't sew. Lizzie wishes to be remembered to Mr. and Mrs. Memmott, and we all send our best love to you, and remain Your Sincere Friends, A. and E. Newbould
PS. Lottie and Alice send love to Abbey and James Henry. Write as soon as possible.10 Alfred Newbould was employed by Meriden Cutlery Co. between 1891 and 1895 at South Meriden, Connecticut.11
     Alfred Newbould, age 43, appears as head of household in the census of 7 June 1900 in Meriden, New Haven, Connecticut, with Elizabeth Mahony, Lottie Newbould, Alice Clara Newbould, Carrie Newbould and Florence Ida Newbould.2
     Alfred Newbould, age 52, appears as head of household in the census of 21 April 1910 in Meriden, Connecticut, with Elizabeth Mahony, Carrie Newbould and Florence Ida Newbould.3 Alfred Newbould and Elizabeth Mahony resided on 21 April 1910 at Hannon Avenue, Meriden, Connecticut, with their daughters, Carrie and Florence.3 Alfred Newbould was a cutter in the cuttery works on 21 April 1910 at Meriden, Connecticut.3 He was employed by the Meriden Cutlery Company. He had the secret formula for making and fixing stag horn handles on knives and forks at Meriden, Connecticut.12 He died on 17 December 1918 at age 63 of a heart attack or choking on his false teeth.13,12

Family

Elizabeth Mahony b. 21 Mar 1856, d. May 1936
Children

Census Records

DateLocationMemo
1891Toxteth Park, Liverpool, Lancashire, EnglandAlfred Newbould appears as Alfred Newbould, age 34, in the census of 1891 at Toxteth Park, Liverpool, Lancashire, England,in the household of Walter Davis S. Boadle as a visitor; Amelia's sister, Elizabeth, her husband, Alfred, and daughters, Lottie, Alice and Carrie were visiting the Boadle family at the time of the enumeration. A servant by the name of Elizabeth Booth, age 49, was also living in the household.8
1900Meriden, New Haven, ConnecticutAlfred Newbould, age 43, appears as head of household in the census of 7 June 1900 in Meriden, New Haven, Connecticut, with Elizabeth Mahony, Lottie Newbould, Alice Clara Newbould, Carrie Newbould and Florence Ida Newbould.2
1910Meriden, ConnecticutAlfred Newbould, age 52, appears as head of household in the census of 21 April 1910 in Meriden, Connecticut, with Elizabeth Mahony, Carrie Newbould and Florence Ida Newbould.3

Residence Records

YearLocationDetails
189145 Upper Hill Street, Toxteth Park, EnglandAlfred Newbould and Elizabeth Mahony were visiting Elizabeth's sister, Amelia Boadle (husband Walter and daughter Amelia) with their children Carrie, Lottie, and Alice in 1891 at 45 Upper Hill Street, Toxteth Park, England.8
21 April 1910Hannon Avenue, Meriden, ConnecticutAlfred Newbould and Elizabeth Mahony resided on 21 April 1910 at Hannon Avenue, Meriden, Connecticut, with their daughters, Carrie and Florence.3

Citations

  1. [S217] England and Wales, Free BMD Marriage Index:1837-1983: Alfred Newbould and Elizabeth Mahony.
  2. [S283] Alfred Newbould household, 1900 United States Federal Census, New Haven, Connecticut, population schedule, Meriden, ED 316, sheet 7, dwelling 108, family 113.
  3. [S441] Alfred Newbould household, 1910 United States Federal Census, New Haven, Connecticut, population schedule, Meriden, ED 345, sheet 6A, dwelling 100, family 119.
  4. [S783] The Newbould Family and Tom Mahony, S. S. Aurania Passenger and Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, 20 December 1886; Microfilm serial: M237, Microfilm Roll: M237_502as viewed on Ancestry.com.
  5. [S504] Phone conversation, Allen Wesley Morrisey, 21 October 2007.
  6. [S782] Letter, Alfred and Elizabeth Newbould to Mr. and Mrs. Guest, 24 December 1886.
  7. [S1635] Carrie Newbould entry, Birth Registration, shows the occupation of her father as a laborer (21 March 1887).
  8. [S387] 1891 England Census, Lancashire County, Toxteth Park, England, GSU Roll 6098034.
  9. [S387] 1891 England Census, Lancashire County, Toxteh Park, England, GSU Roll 6098034.
  10. [S781] Letter, Alfred and Elizabeth Newbould to Mr. and Mrs. Guest, The postmark on the original letter reads "Dec. 15, 1891."
  11. [S390] Meriden, Connecticut City Directory.
  12. [S594] Notes on the Mahoney/Newbould Family, Ruth Parker Storrs to Robert Smith.
  13. [S519] Questionnaire, Susan Parker Storrs Schongalla Andrews to Taryn L. Phelan, 5 November 2007, Susan added this info to a Family group sheet of her parents that I sent to her.
  14. [S1498] England, Select Births and Christenings: Lollie (sic) Newbould; Baptism: shows father as Alfred Newbould, 1538-1975, Ancestry.com.
  15. [S387] 1891 England Census, Lancashire County, Toxteth Park, England, GSU Roll 6098034, shows the daughter of Alfred Newbould as Lottie Newbould.
  16. [S527] Unknown author, "Alfred and Elizabeth Newbould Descendancy Chart."
  17. [S387] 1891 England Census, Lancashire County, Toxteth Park, England, GSU Roll 6098034, shows the daughter of Alfred Newbould as Alice Newbould.
  18. [S1635] Carrie Newbould entry, Birth Registration, shows father as Alfred Newbould (21 March 1887).
  19. [S387] 1891 England Census, Lancashire County, Toxteth Park, England, GSU Roll 6098034, shows the daughter of Alfred Newbould as Carrie Newbould.
  20. [S441] Alfred Newbould household, 1910 United States Federal Census, New Haven, Connecticut, population schedule, Meriden, ED 345, sheet 6A, dwelling 100, family 119|.